Pull Out All The Stops – Restoration work

http://youtu.be/a8x4N5PzzaE

Follow the link to watch a film of the incredible restoration work which took place in September 2011 at the organ builders Harrison & Harrison Ltd in Durham.

Pull Out All The Stops – Launch video, September 2010

Here is the video we created to launch the campaign to restore the Royal Festival Hall organ back in September 2010.

Progress of the restoration and reinstallation of the Royal Festival Hall Organ

Work has now begun on the central section of the organ with the cleaning, restoring and making of components having started in the Harrison & Harrison workshops in Durham in January and February of this year.

The central section of the organ comprises much of the Pedal Organ as well as the Great Reed Chorus 16, 8, and 4 and the Mounted Cornet that are both at the front of the top level. The mechanism associated with this pipe work consists of soundboards, underactions, reservoirs, wind trunks and the framework for the instrument. At the front of this section sits the Monogram, the central design of dummy pipes which will be restored but not fitted until the final section of the instrument is in place.

Materials including leather, timber and glues have been purchased enabling work to be carried out to the tremulants for the manual divisions which are comprised of leather membranes, paddles, valves and encasement boxes. Other items under construction include the new wind reservoirs. The underactions have also been removed from storage and are now being acclimatised before restoration work begins on the leather motors.

We still have £1million left to raise to complete the project and hope that you will help to restore this magnificent organ by sponsoring one or more pipes – there are pipes available from £30 to £10,000. In return for your donation, you will receive a certificate and details of the pipe/s you have sponsored, and your support will be acknowledged on our website. We will also keep you up-to-date with the project’s progress and invite you to the celebratory performances in 2014. Please click on the link below to sponsor a pipe:
http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/name-a-pipe

Get to know… Paula Chateauneuf

The Bernstein Project Installation
Get to know… Paula Chateauneuf
Over one weekend in October lutenist Paula Chateauneuf curates Take The Risk, an innovative and exciting series of concerts and workshops at Southbank Centre that explore improvisation in early music. So where does Willy Wonka, ballet and a good coffee supply fit in with this much sought-after musician? Let’s find out shall we…
What – or where – is perfection?
Sitting in a formal herb garden on a sunny day in Italy with my partner and good friends, fine conversation and a glass of chilled white wine.
Who is your favourite hero from fiction?
Willy Wonka, because he is an irresistible eccentric who is very much his own man.
What’s your favourite ritual?
My morning cappuccino break (I’ve got a fantastic Classic Gaggia and coffee supplier).
Which living person do you most admire?
I have complete admiration for those who devote their lives to educating others. They do the most important job in the world and hold the future in their hands.
What do I fear the most?
Being fearful.
What other talent or skill would you like to possess?
To sing really well, a bit of jazz and a bit of opera.
Tell us about a special memory you have of Southbank Centre?
Seeing a production of Swan Lake (by a Russian company, can’t remember which one). It was my first proper ballet experience (at the tender age of 43) and I was overwhelmed by the powerful emotion the art of dance can conjure.
If you could programme your ideal Southbank Centre show, which  artists (living or dead) would you bring together?
I would love to gather together the original cast of Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo (with the original sets and costumes) for a performance of the work directed by the composer, in a replica of the octagonal mirrored room where it was probably first presented.
What is the most important lesson life has taught you?
You must do whatever you’re doing from the heart. Even if you have to work hard for what you want, you must never lose sight of why you’re doing it.
Paula Chateauneuf

Paula Chateauneuf

Over one weekend in October lutenist Paula Chateauneuf curates Take The Risk, an innovative and exciting series of concerts and workshops at Southbank Centre that explore improvisation in early music.

So where does Willy Wonka, ballet and a good coffee supply fit in with this much sought-after musician? Let’s find out shall we…

What – or where – is perfection?

Sitting in a formal herb garden on a sunny day in Italy with my partner and good friends, fine conversation and a glass of chilled white wine.

Who is your favourite hero from fiction?

Willy Wonka, because he is an irresistible eccentric who is very much his own man.

What’s your favourite ritual?

My morning cappuccino break (I’ve got a fantastic Classic Gaggia and coffee supplier).

Which living person do you most admire?

I have complete admiration for those who devote their lives to educating others. They do the most important job in the world and hold the future in their hands.

What do I fear the most?

Being fearful.

What other talent or skill would you like to possess?

To sing really well, a bit of jazz and a bit of opera.

Tell us about a special memory you have of Southbank Centre?

Seeing a production of Swan Lake (by a Russian company, can’t remember which one). It was my first proper ballet experience (at the tender age of 43) and I was overwhelmed by the powerful emotion the art of dance can conjure.

If you could programme your ideal Southbank Centre show, which  artists (living or dead) would you bring together?

I would love to gather together the original cast of Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo (with the original sets and costumes) for a performance of the work directed by the composer, in a replica of the octagonal mirrored room where it was probably first presented.

What is the most important lesson life has taught you?

You must do whatever you’re doing from the heart. Even if you have to work hard for what you want, you must never lose sight of why you’re doing it.

Take The Risk Weekend – An Introduction

wishart

Stevie Wishart

Once upon a time, in the very distant past, music existed in neither written nor printed form; it was both learnt and performed through the simple combined devices of memory, variation and improvisation. Thousands of years later many musicians still work in exactly this manner; but in one genre – that of classical music – working without music has become something of an exception, particularly and increasingly during the last half millennium. Sometimes the text from which classical musicians play has been merely a set of ‘reminders’, a few dots and dashes to indicate approximate form, structure and expression. But often, and increasingly from the eighteenth century onwards, the text is not merely an aide-memoire, but a complex attempt by the composer to both articulate and prescribe actual expression for the performer.
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