Free Live Relay of Steve Reich with London Sinfonietta

Steve Reich

This Sunday 31st October Minimalist icon Steve Reich leads a performance of his own music at Royal Festival Hall. Visiting from New York, Bang on a Can perform the first half including the early classic Clapping Music, the lilting layers of Electric Counterpoint and the brilliant Sextet. Before London Sinfonietta take the stage in the second half for the shimmeringly beautiful Music for 18 Musicians.

Tickets for Steve Reich’s concert went in a flash but due to the huge excitement around this concert we’ve arranged for a free live video stream stream of the performance.

At 8pm The Clore Ballroom at Royal Festival Hall hosts a larger-than-life projection screen giving you a rare and exciting opportunity to view a live relay of this exhilarating performance.

Admission is free (places may be limited); access to the Ballroom from 7pm.

Find out more about this concert at:
http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/find/music/classical/tickets/london-sinfonietta-46779

Get to know… Angela Gheorghiu

What do you fear the most?
Death, because we do not know anything about it, there are only divagations and fiction about this topic.
Which mobile number do you call the most?
This is my secret.
What – or where – is perfection?
In divinity, in nature, in art…
Who is your favourite hero from fiction (book/comic/film/opera) – and why?
Charlie Chaplin in everything: in acting, ideas, music, subtlety… and because he is a genius!
What’s your favourite ritual?
Breakfast!
Which living person do you most admire (and why)?
Roberto Benigni and Dalai Lama. Because they possess the power to make people dream and hope…
What other talent or skill would you like to possess?
I’d like to compose, to be a sculptor, a priest maybe…
Tell us about a special memory you have of Southbank?
I remember a concert I did there for Prince Charles – an extraordinary human being, a very courteous man and a true fan of classical music!
If you could programme your ideal Southbank Centre show, which artists (living or dead) would you bring together?
Virginia Zeani and Franco Corelli.
Angela Gheorghiu

Angela Gheorghiu

What do you fear the most?

Death, because we do not know anything about it, there are only divagations and fiction about this topic.

Which mobile number do you call the most?

This is my secret.

What – or where – is perfection?

In divinity, in nature, in art…

Who is your favourite hero from fiction (book/comic/film/opera) – and why?

Charlie Chaplin in everything: in acting, ideas, music, subtlety… and because he is a genius!


What’s your favourite ritual?

Breakfast!

Which living person do you most admire (and why)?

Roberto Benigni and Dalai Lama. Because they possess the power to make people dream and hope…

What other talent or skill would you like to possess?

I’d like to compose, to be a sculptor, a priest maybe…

Tell us about a special memory you have of Southbank?

I remember a concert I did there for Prince Charles – an extraordinary human being, a very courteous man and a true fan of classical music!

If you could programme your ideal Southbank Centre show, which artists (living or dead) would you bring together?

Virginia Zeani and Franco Corelli.

‘The Rest Is Noise’ author Alex Ross on Bernstein & Nixon

BernsteinLeonard Bernstein has always been a politically polarising figure, as his profile grew, a man who’s radical associations provoked serious concern amongst the American political establishment. What form this concern might have taken and how it might have impacted Bernstein’s career has until recently always been something of mystery. Last year The New Yorker‘s music critic Alex Ross undertook to wade through Bernstein eight-hundred page F.B.I. file, contemporary Whitehouse memos and tapes – the result is what Ross call ‘a three part multimedia tour of the latest Bernsteiniana’, a compelling portrait of Bernstein through the eyes of a nervous Nixon administration.

Ross reveals is an era of institutional paranoia thankfully consigned to history, nonetheless there is a strange kind of reverence implicit in the fear that surrounds Bernstein. It is a sad to think that the era when the work of a young composer might constitute a popular political and cultural force to challenge  government might also be behind us.

Alex Ross: The Bernstein Files

Introduction
Part 1: Bernstein and the F.B.I.
Part 2:  Bernstein and Nixon’s Plumbers
Part 3:  Bernstein in the Nixon tapes

Introduction

Part 1: Bernstein and the F.B.I.

Part 2:  Bernstein and Nixon’s Plumbers

Part 3:  Bernstein in the Nixon tapes

The OAE Present… Haydn: The Artist’s Choice

Yannick Nezet-Seguin

This Thursday marks both the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment’s new season of concerts and the OAE debut for acclaimed young conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin.

For this concert, the OAE asked Nézet-Séguin and contemporary composers Sally Beamish and Hugh Wood to chose their favourite late-Haydn symphonies for performance.

The programme includes two of the composer’s most popular pieces, and indeed two of the last he wrote, the London Symphony and the dazzling Trumpet Concerto, performed in this concert by OAE Principal Trumpet, David Blackadder.

Don’t miss OAE Extras at 5.45pm on the evening of the concert when Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Hugh Wood and Sally Beamish discuss the pieces selected.

Admission for the pre-concert discussion is free, to book tickets for the evening’s performance visit:
http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/find/music/classical/tickets/orchestra-of-the-age-of-enlightenment-44123

The Night Shift: Haydn

nightShiftDJ

London’s unique late-night classical event, The Night Shift, is back for a fourth year. The Night Shift is all about being able to enjoy great music in a relaxed atmosphere. Unlike most classical concerts you can bring a drink in, go out to get one and don’t need to worry about clapping in the wrong place.

The Night Shift

Our next event on Thurday 15th October showcases a musical superstar of the 18th century, Joseph Haydn, featuring his dazzling Trumpet Concerto and his last ever Symphony, the London Symphony. The hour-long concert is conducted by the brilliant young Yannick Nezet-Seguin, making his Night Shift debut, and is presented from the stage by Alistair Appleton.

The Night Shift

Before the concert, from 9pm, relax in the Queen Elizabeth Hall bar with eclectic Indo-British folk from Sunday Driver, plus a chilled post-concert DJ set from Rico Portland until midnight.

Buy Tickets & Watch the Trailer at:

http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/find/music/classical/tickets/the-night-shift-48744